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Directory of  C. American Owls Directory of N. American Owls

Long-eared Owl
A Reference for North and Central American Owls

 The Long-eared Owl is found around the world in the Northern Hemisphere. In North America it is similar in color to the Great Horned Owl but is smaller, thinner and  its chest bars have vertical cross streaks. Here you will find photos, recordings and a brief field notes section to help identify and enjoy this beautiful owl. A more in depth write up and range map can be found in its natural history page (the Biology link). To jump immediately to any of these sections use the Page Jump Links below.

Page Jump Links:
Photo Gallery
Audio Recordings
Field Notes
Biology

 

PHOTO GALLERY
Click on the thumbnail to bring up each of the Owl photos.

Long-eared Owl Photo
96K
Long-eared Owl Photo
105K
Long-eared Owl Photo
113K

California Sierras
near Yosemite
October 1999

Mason Regional Park
Orange county, California
December 2000
Newport Back Bay,
California
November 2007
Long-eared Owl Photo
91K
Long-eared Owl Photo
57K
Long-eared Owl Photo
81K
Antelope Valley
California
February 2004
Page Springs Camp Ground
Oregon
May 1999
San Jacinto Wildlife Area,
California
November 2000

Additional Photos

Photo 1
180K

Photo 2
157K
Photo 3
56K
Photo 4
171K

RECORDINGS
Click on the sonograms to bring up each of the recordings.

Sound File
32K
California Sierras
near Yosemite
September 1999

Advertisement (male) song.

FIELD NOTES
 Long-eared owl - Asio otus

 In flight, the Long-eared Owl is very similar to the Short-eared Owl, as the ear tufts are almost invisible. The Long-eared is generally darker overall, though, and has cross barring along the sides and chest as opposed to the Short-eared Owl's streaking; the facial disk is also rusty rather than whitish. its markings are similar to the Great Horned Owl although its longer more closely separated ear tufts, smaller size and slender shape set it apart. The sexes are alike although the males tend to be paler. These are nocturnal owls that roost in dense foliage near tree trunks in the daylight hours. Length is 15" (about the size of a Cooper's Hawk), similar to both the Barn and Short-eared Owls. Winter roosts consist of 7-50 birds and are often used year after year by similar number of owls. When disturbed at a roost, the Long-eared Owl will adopt a sleek upright posture with ear tufts fully erect.

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